If you’re thinking of heading down under, an Australia road trip has to be one of the best options for seeing the most of this diverse (and pretty enormous!) country.

Grab some wheels and set out into the unknown, either through the western outback, along the beautiful, rugged coastlines or deep into the heart of the red centre of Australia.

1. East coast: Cairns to Brisbane

This drive between Cairns and Brisbane is one of the most popular road trip routes in Australia. The winding drive stays close to the coast and passes some of the country’s most impressive natural highlights – Fraser Island, the Whitsundays and of course, the Great Barrier Reef Islands. A great introduction to Australia, Queensland is the adventure centre of Oz, with skydiving, bungee jumping and rafting being just a few of the adventures you can choose.

The stunning shore of Queensland is reason enough to drive the entirety of the coastal route from Cairns to Brisbane, but the myriad of beaches and islands accessible from the road is another game-changer if you're thinking of choosing this route! The road is well maintained with sections so close to the coast you’ll almost skim the water’s edge, so make sure you include Cairns to Brisbane as a surface sector of your round the world trip.

Highlights: Cape Tribulation, Mission Beach, Whitsunday Islands, Fraser Island.

Stop at Seventeen Seventy; a stunning little town along the Capricorn Coast where Captain Cook first landed in 1770 which offers fantastic coastal walks.

When to go? Australian winter (June-September) is the best time to see Queensland. The hotter summers bring humidity where the warm winters are dry and pleasant, especially for driving.

How long? Take your time with this one; a minimum of two weeks will make sure you see the highlights at the relaxed pace that Queenslanders are used to.

 

2. Pacific Highway: Brisbane to Sydney

This route takes you between two of Australia's largest cities, Sydney and Brisbane. Once you’ve left Brisbane you’re basically just hopping from beach to beach as you journey along the Pacific coast. The pretty rocks of Bouddi National Park and wide open beaches of Lennox Head and Byron Bay lead you south, with locals and travellers alike taking to the waves with their surfboards.

The east coast drive runs parallel to the humpback whales' migration route towards Antarctica, so you can stop almost anywhere along the route and book on to a whale watching trip. Head inland to the Hunter Valley for a vineyard tour and sample a fine glass of Chardonnay before cruising into Sydney and settling into a quayside bar to watch the sun set behind the sails of the opera house.

The rugged shore of the Pacific coast shelters many beautiful inlets and coves that are begging to be discovered and driving is the perfect way to explore! Using public transport or flying means that huge chunks of the idyllic seashore remain unseen and believe me, it’s you that will be missing out. The locals along this populated shore are friendly and happy to share their paradise with you – the ball’s in your court!

Highlights: Gold Coast, Byron Bay, Hunter Valley, Lennox Head.

This drive includes the Bouddi National Park, Seal Rocks and Lennox Head which are off the beaten track and make this amazing coastal drive all the more memorable.

When to go? For comfortable temperatures, stick to spring and autumn to drive this heavenly route.

How long? 5 days is probably the minimum but as soon as you hit Byron Bay and the Hunter Valley, you’ll want to extend it to 9 or 10. 

 

3. Great Ocean Road: Melbourne to Adelaide

One of the world’s most scenic coastal drives, the Great Ocean Road weaves its way alongside the windswept Southern Ocean.

Home to some of Australia’s most famous surf meccas (Bells Beach near Torquay holds major championships) and the limestone towers known as the 12 Apostles in Port Campbell National Park, you’ll discover an unblemished coastline within an easy drive of Melbourne. Venture into the pristine rainforest for a bush walk to find an astonishing variety of native wildlife including koalas, kangaroos and maybe a platypus or two.

Discover delicious local produce in the quaint village of Port Fairy, see Cape Otway Lighthouse - Australia’s oldest mainland lighthouse, and learn about ancient aboriginal life at the Narana Aboriginal Cultural Centre.

Highlights: 12 Apostles, London Bridge, Tower Hill Reserve

"The best way to get a bird's eye view of every one of the Twelve Apostles and the shipwreck coast is with a scenic helicopter flight."

When to go? The summer months (December and January) see hot temperatures and chaotic tourist spots. Consider visiting in the quieter winter months (June to August) when whale sightings are common, sunsets intense and the roads are quieter.

How long? Don’t rush. Day trippers from Melbourne are a common site but you’ll want to spend 3 days exploring everything along the way.

 

4. Adelaide to Darwin: The Stuart Highway

This classic route echoes the journey made by John McDouall Stuart to get from Adelaide to Darwin, the capital of the Northern Territory on the coast. Follow the lonely road through the heart of Australia and watch the scenery change from the mountainous Flinders Ranges into the red rock of the central desert and the huge gorges of the north. Nearly 3000km of road, this is the ultimate road trip that will lead you through the heart of the Australian outback.

Nothing says road trip like the deserts of Australia, where the best way to experience true Aussie spirit is to set off into the distance and not look back. This route through the wilderness to the northern coast of Australia was only completed by John Mc Douall Stuart and his team 150 years ago and travelling through the vast centre of the country is still seen as a huge achievement!

Highlights: Flinders Ranges, Uluru, Kings Canyon, Katherine Gorge.

Katherine Gorge is amazing. Kayaking amongst the birds and wildlife by day, camping under the Milky Way by night. Stunning.

When to go? April to early October is the most popular time to drive, when temperatures are cooler and humidity lower, and once you get to the far north, it’s much cooler to explore Darwin and surrounds. The rest of the year is rainy season and daily rainstorms are fairly common - that said, visiting during the rainy season also gives a unique view of Central Australia that few experience.

How long? You’ll need ideally a minimum of 10 days although trips to Uluru and Kings Canyon may mean you take this route a little slower than expected.

Tip: If you’d prefer not to drive this route – check out the Ghan train which covers the same route.

 

5. South west edge: Adelaide to Perth

The long route along Australia's southern coast is one of the most impressive drives on our list, largely thanks to the plains through which it snakes its way from Adelaide to Perth. The Nullarbor Plain (null – no, arbor – trees) is a huge expanse and one of the harshest environments in the country, with stretches of road where you won’t see a soul or building for hundreds of kilometres. One 90 mile section of road is completely straight – you’d have to have pretty good eyes to see the end though! Don’t forget to stop in Cape Le Grand National Park for the beautiful beaches and Kalgoorlie to see the gold panning.

‘Crossing the Nullarbor’ is one of the classic Australian outback experiences and one of the ultimate Aussie drives. The open road and absence of cities means it is one of the best places for stargazing – pull over, lie down on the bonnet and see if you can spot the ‘The Emu in the Sky’ and the Southern Cross. You won’t see these views if you fly from Adelaide to Perth!

Highlights: The Nullarbor Plain, Kalgoorlie, Cape Le Grand National Park, Wave Rock.

Don't miss cage diving with sharks in Port Lincoln - what an amazing experience!

When to go? In the searing heat of the summer sun this trip would not be so pleasant, so pack your bags for this trip sometime between July and September.

How long? Allow around ten days from Perth to Adelaide will mean you have enough time to soak in the solitude of this beautifully scenic road. 

 

6. West coast: Perth to Broome

If you really want to get off the tourist trail, head west to drive the amazing road between Perth and Broome. This drive takes you through the bush into the wilds of Australia, hugging the coast as the road heads north through the gorges of Western Australia. Feed cheeky quokkas on Rottnest Island and dolphins in Monkey Mia, dive on the Ningaloo Reef before arriving in Broome to relax on the red beaches of Roebuck Bay.

Western Australia is much less visited than the eastern coast which means that tourism is less noticeable here. Driving through the untouched outback, hopping between national parks and empty beaches is a brilliant way to get to know his area, rather than simply visiting the main city of Perth. With so much to offer, this drive will allow you fall in love with the deserving west of Australia.

Highlights: Monkey Mia, Ningaloo Reef, Karijini National Park, Shark Bay.

Don't miss swimming with whale sharks on Ningaloo Reef and getting a famous ‘Quokka selfie’ with these cheeky creatures on Rottnest Island.

When to go? Spring (September – November) and autumn (March – May) are the best times to drive, avoiding the hot, dry season and the rainy season.

How long? Around 12 days will give you enough time to cover this drive but the stunning national parks and beaches on the road to Broome may tempt you to stay longer.

 

7. Tasmania: ocean loop

Tasmania’s island status often excludes it from collections of great Australian road trips but we saw no need for that here. Tasmania is an easy ride from Melbourne on the ferry or a simple 1hr 15 minute flight and the ocean road loops right round the island meaning you can stay close to the rugged beaches that encase this beautiful isle. History, culture and wildlife await you in the jewel of Australia.

There is no better way to see Tasmania than to drive. The opportunity to stop and explore wherever you please is a massive bonus when visiting the island. Rather than sticking to the city, driving gives you the chance to uncover areas of Tasmania that are inaccessible by public transport. The distances are short and the views incredible; Tasmania has the recipe for the perfect road trip!

Highlights: Wineglass Bay, Port Arthur, Table Mountain, Hobart.

A fantastic stop on this route is Kate's Berry Farm on the east coast. Stop here for beautiful views and homemade milkshakes and cheesecake!

When to go? Summer and early autumn in Australia (December to April) are the most pleasant seasons to visit Tasmania, with warm days and cool refreshing nights. You can easily fly into Hobart or get the ferry from Melbourne across to Devonport. We can arrange the ferry tickets for you, just ask us! 

How long? You could technically drive round Tasmania in 3 days and rush past everything, but your best bet is to stretch it out for 8 – 13 days and enjoy everything the Apple Isle has to offer.

Interested in planning an Australia road trip?

We can help you plan an amazing Australia road trip, whatever your time scale or budget! Whether you’re looking for car hire arrangements with hotels, or to take yourself off in a campervan, we’ll help you find the best way to do it and we create a tailor-made Australia holiday to suit you. Our team can offer first-hand advice on timescales and top things to see and do along the way, based on their own travel experience.

To start planning your trip – call us on +44 1273320580 or request a quote by email.

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